Free eBooks!



Where to Find eBooks for Free
Even if you don’t have an e-reader, you can read ebooks on your computer using the Adobe Digital Editions or the Kindle App for Mac or PC, all of which are free. 

Kindle Nation Daily – Scroll down the bottom left column to find widgets for free Kindle books and 99-cent Kindle books, listed by genre. Pages and pages of book available for each genre.

eReader News Today – This is a direct link to ENT’s daily Kindle deals. They update 2-3 times a day, with 3-5 books each time which are free on Amazon for a limited time period, usually a day.

Even if these books are not your cup of tea, they can be used on BookLending and LendInk (see below) to trade for other books.


                 Swapping Sites: Kindle & Nook                      

1. Make a free account.
2. Search for a book you own. Click “Lend”, and receive 1 credit per book you lend to others. You will receive instructions on lending via email when someone wants to borrow your book.
3. Search for a book you want to read. Click “Borrow.”
4. Check your email, click the included link, and receive the book. A credit is removed from your account.

BookLending
Pros: Best search interface, greatest availability of titles, gives you a credit just for listing one of your books to borrow (no need to actually wait for someone to borrow it).
Cons: Only works with Kindle.

eBookFling 
Pros: Works with Kindle and Nook. Weekly Deals emails sent to notify you of a book made free for one dayexclusively for eBookFling members. “Fling” these books to other readers here, or on other sites.
Cons: You can “Instant Fling” some of your books which means that simply listing them for loan will give you a credit, but with many books, you do not get a credit until someone asks to borrow.

LendInk 
Pros: One free credit just for signing up, works with Kindle, Nook, and the rest. Additional credits are given just for listing a book you have as available to lend. 
Cons: Least available titles of the three, deceptive lender interface (that makes it look like they have more books available than they really do). 

eBookFling claims that Nook books work with other e-readers, but I’ve never tested it out or heard testimonials and having seen how Nook lending works (through logging in to BN.com and going to Nook library – something which other e-reader owners can’t do), I’m skeptical. Let me know if you’ve tried.

                       From Your Local Library: Any e-Reader                        
Visit OverDrive, click “Library Search”, and enter your location. Usually, cardholders can borrow from any library in their state of residence.

Pros: 

  • Many bestsellers are unlendable elsewhere are available here at the e-library. 
  • Get your book instantly, no need to exchange yours in return or wait on private lenders.
  • This is best for those with cards to library systems that have large libraries – Dallas is one place with a stellar collection including many recent releases. In some states, however, having a library card to any local library allows access to most public libraries in the state. 

Cons: 

  • If you live somewhere like Wyoming, the selection at any of the libraries in the state leave much to be desired. 
  • The library websites are a hassle to find, and even typing “OverDrive” on Google doesn’t take you to the right place. Once you’ve found the best library site in your state, make sure you bookmark it. If you’re on a computer other than your own, you can always come to Wonderland and use the link I’ve provided above.

2 comments:

  1. This post is great, is really informative. It offers great options for us readers.

    ReplyDelete

    Replies

    1. Thanks, Jess! Glad you find it helpful.

      Delete

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